Take Care


I’m a teacher. I’m a writer. And for the first time in my career I’m finding those two things at war. I’m teaching six days a week which means my writing time is down to nothing, and I’m having to cut somewhere, everywhere to find time for my writing. However, the teacher/mentor in me has difficulty placing my work first. This is a bad thing.

When the airline tells parents to place their masks on first, it’s not an act of selfishness or egotism. They know a dead parent is no help to the child. I’m no good to my fellow writers if I’ve allowed my own creative well to run dry. So, I find myself having to take a step back. I’m having to tell the teacher in me to sit down and shut up so that the writer can do what she needs to. Or more importantly, what she must do. Teaching six days a week means I’m always in teacher mode. I don’t know how to shut it off anymore.

My internal writer is struggling. It’s not getting any help from the rejection slips; but in all honestly, I’m not submitting either because when would I do that? 2 a.m.? I’ve lost sight of the big picture. Hell, I’ve lost sight of any picture. “Get your act together,” I told myself yesterday. I marathon graded all week. I needed to write. I sat down to do it, determination in every pore. I woke hours later with my fingers still on the keyboard. And no words on the screen.

What do you do when the creative well runs dry?

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3 Comments

Filed under Writing

3 responses to “Take Care

  1. pomemoogan

    In high school, I was determined to write a fictionalized version of my life story. When I’d hit a block, I would take a walk or spend time with people that I don’t usually. When that wouldn’t work, I’d think of a particular situation and overanalyze it. It’s amazing how many details I could pull out.

  2. I pick up a good book and just start reading. This usually gets me out of a funk, especially when I read books in my genre. It’s okay for writers to put down the pen every now and then to recharge.

    I also find Stephen King’s ‘On Writing’ helpful.

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